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Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Two local developers have launched a crowdfunding campaign to prove games aren't just fun, they also have the power to make a difference in the world.

 

In their game, Ebola Attack, players act as the hero white blood cell that must protect the red cells from a deadly infection: the Ebola virus. Over the course of the game, the human body is healed as gamers progress through increasing levels of difficulty. The player’s goal is to save as many people as possible, meanwhile, all net profits from the purchase of the app will aid the relief effort in the very real Ebola war zone in West Africa.

 

 

Another January start to good health...healthy heart

Another January start to good health...healthy heart
The Workout...  The first two weeks have been better than I thought possible. Although 30 pounds heavier than my heart attack weight, my stamina is better than at any other time in the last 10 years.  The not smoking and walking everyday has paid off. Gaining that much weight proves my "one meal a day habit" is cured.  More intake needed to fuel the body also means more movement is needed to keep off the weight. My efforts to balance that have failed. Snacks and more meat and potatoes than needed have been half the problem, cardio exercise or lack of, is the other half.  The body is a machine according to Dr Keith Kadel, Cardiologist, and it needs to be used, revved up and put through the paces. We need to put blood through the heart and get it to all areas of the body.   The heart beats 100,000 times a day and if it can beat a little slower it runs more efficiently.

Grant County woman dies from influenza complications

Grant County woman dies from influenza complications

The Grant County Health District (GCHD) was notified this week that a Grant County woman has died from influenza complications.

“We are deeply saddened to learn of this loss,” Dr. Alexander Brzezny, Grant County Health Officer said. “Since the beginning of December, there has been a significant increase in influenza cases in all age groups in Grant County.”

 

INBC reaches safe levels of O-negative and O-positive blood

INBC reaches safe levels of O-negative and O-positive blood

The Inland Northwest Blood Center announced good news on Thursday regarding the levels of O-negative and O-positive blood. The only supplier of blood for area hospitals reported that the supply of these types of blood has reached safe levels.  INBC said that thanks to the donors who have rolled up their sleeve to give blood, they have seen nearly 500 type O donors since Monday. This is a huge response that has brought the blood supply up a remarkable 90% in the last few days.

INBC reminded donors the need for blood does not go on vacation. They urge donors who have made an appointment to keep them in order to ensure blood supply remains at needed levels. INBC needs 200 donors every day, with nearly 90 of those being type O.

Grant County electronic cigarette and vaping ordinance goes into effect January 1, 2015

Grant County electronic cigarette and vaping ordinance goes into effect January 1, 2015

In September, following a public hearing, the Grant County Board of Health (BOH) unanimously adopted Ordinance 2014-2: Rules and Regulations of the Grant County Health District Restricting the Sale, Marketing, Use, and Availability of Electronic Vapor Devices and E-Liquid.

 

The Grant County Board of Health studied the issue and received public testimony for several months before adopting the Ordinance that addresses two public health concerns not currently being addressed by Washington State or the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

 

The Ordinance restricts the sale and distribution of electronic vapor devices and e-liquid (with or without nicotine) to people 18 and older. Retailers must display a sign that states sales are prohibited to youth under the age of 18. It also requires products to be stored behind a counter or in a locked cabinet and prohibits sales through vending machines where minors are present. In addition, a minor may not to purchase, possess, or obtain electronic vapor devices or e-liquid.

 

Healthcare providers reporting higher than normal number of flu cases in Grant County

Healthcare providers reporting higher than normal number of flu cases in Grant County

The Grant County Health District (GCHD) reported that they have received over 200 positive influenza lab reports in Grant County. Most of the cases are from the past two weeks, and were located in Moses Lake, Quincy, and Mattawa. Additionally, several Moses Lake schools are reporting 10% absenteeism.

 

Since early December, GCHD has been in communication with healthcare providers and schools as the reports are positive flu cases began to increase.

 

With the higher than normal number of flu cases, Grant County Health Officer Dr. Alexander Brzezny wants residents to know that the flu vaccine is still their best protection.

 

“The flu is in our communities year-long but is now increasing at significant numbers which tells us the seasonal epidemic of influenza has started,” states Dr. Brzezny.

 

With holiday travel quickly approaching GCHD urges all residents 6 months and older to get their flu shot as soon as possible. Currently, there is no shortage of flu vaccine and it is widely available through clinics and pharmacies.

 

Grant County Health Officer declares gonorrhea outbreak

Grant County Health Officer declares gonorrhea outbreak

Grant County Health Officer, Dr. Alexander Brzezny, has declared a gonorrhea outbreak due to the sharp increase in the number of gonorrhea cases in Grant County. Public Health nurses are working closely with the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and health care providers to increase testing, reporting, and treatment for gonorrhea. According to Grant County Health, the more people that are tested and treated will reduce the disease being spread between people.

Gonorrhea is a treatable, sexually transmitted disease (STD) that rarely has symptoms in its early stages, especially in women. Gonorrhea can be found through a simple urine test and is treated with inexpensive antibiotics. Because this STD has so few symptoms, testing is extremely important.