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Department of Health asks dog owners to help track ticks through online survey

Department of Health asks dog owners to help track ticks through online survey

 

Washington state health officials are asking dog owners to go online and fill out a short, anonymous survey, and to send the agency any ticks they find during tick season.

 

In Washington, taking the dog for a later winter or spring-time walk comes with the added task of checking four-legged friends for ticks. The tick season has already begun in Western Washington, and in the next few weeks, the Washington State Department of Health says ticks will emerge from their winter hideaways elsewhere in the state.

 

“Many dog owners have found a tick or two on their furry friend after coming home from a walk outside,” said Dr. Liz Dykstra, entomologist for the Department of Health. “We’d like to know more about when and where they’ve picked up ticks, and if their dog has ever been diagnosed with a tick-borne disease.”

 

Washington State Department of Health warns of Salmonella illness tied to baby birds

Washington State Department of Health warns of Salmonella illness tied to baby birds

 

At least 39 Washingtonians have reported getting ill from Salmonella bacteria after coming in contact with live poultry in the past three years, according to reports reviewed by disease investigators at the state’s Department of Health. These 39 cases were associated with three separate national Salmonella outbreaks that caused more than 1,200 people to get sick. Contact with live poultry may also have contributed to more than 100 other cases of salmonellosis in our state in the past three years that weren’t associated with any known outbreak.

 

Spring is the season when many people who have chickens or ducks in backyard flocks buy baby birds. From the time the baby birds arrive at home, children should be supervised carefully to make sure they wash their hands immediately after touching the animals or their environments. Another prevention step is to make sure children don’t snuggle or kiss the young poultry.

 

Grant County Health District investigating 5 confirmed cases of whooping cough in Moses Lake schools

Grant County Health District investigating 5 confirmed cases of whooping cough in Moses Lake schools

 

The Grant County Health District (GCHD) staff are investigating five laboratory confirmed cases and 149 people that came in close contact with ill individuals with whooping cough (pertussis) at Peninsula Elementary and Chief Moses Middle School in Moses Lake. According to the GCHD, no individuals have been hospitalized due to the illness at this time.

 

“We are responding to a cluster of whooping cough cases among students in Moses Lake. Because of a large number of exposed and ill individuals in a very well-defined area, we are considering this a local cluster outbreak,” said Dr. Alexander Brzezny, Grant County Health Officer. “Preventing severe disease and death in infants is our highest priority. We urge all pregnant women to get vaccinated and urge parents to vaccinate infants and children if they are not up to date.”

 

Change your clocks, change your batteries: Ephrata FD reminds citizens to maintain smoke alarms

Change your clocks, change your batteries: Ephrata FD reminds citizens to maintain smoke alarms

 

Daylight savings will begin at 2:00 a.m. on Sunday March 8th, and the Ephrata Fire Department is asking residents to take the opportunity to test and change the batteries in their smoke detectors as they set their clocks forward. Smoke alarms in the home are considered one of the best and least expensive means of providing an early warning of a potentially deadly fire. 

 

Every year in the United States, about 3,000 people lost their lives in residential fires. Changing smoke alarm batteries at least one a year, testing those alarms, and reminding others to do the same are some of the simplest, most effective ways to reduce these tragic deaths and injuries.

 

The Ephrata Fire Department provided these important facts regarding smoke alarms:

Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Two local developers have launched a crowdfunding campaign to prove games aren't just fun, they also have the power to make a difference in the world.

 

In their game, Ebola Attack, players act as the hero white blood cell that must protect the red cells from a deadly infection: the Ebola virus. Over the course of the game, the human body is healed as gamers progress through increasing levels of difficulty. The player’s goal is to save as many people as possible, meanwhile, all net profits from the purchase of the app will aid the relief effort in the very real Ebola war zone in West Africa.

 

 

Another January start to good health...healthy heart

Another January start to good health...healthy heart
The Workout...  The first two weeks have been better than I thought possible. Although 30 pounds heavier than my heart attack weight, my stamina is better than at any other time in the last 10 years.  The not smoking and walking everyday has paid off. Gaining that much weight proves my "one meal a day habit" is cured.  More intake needed to fuel the body also means more movement is needed to keep off the weight. My efforts to balance that have failed. Snacks and more meat and potatoes than needed have been half the problem, cardio exercise or lack of, is the other half.  The body is a machine according to Dr Keith Kadel, Cardiologist, and it needs to be used, revved up and put through the paces. We need to put blood through the heart and get it to all areas of the body.   The heart beats 100,000 times a day and if it can beat a little slower it runs more efficiently.

Grant County woman dies from influenza complications

Grant County woman dies from influenza complications

The Grant County Health District (GCHD) was notified this week that a Grant County woman has died from influenza complications.

“We are deeply saddened to learn of this loss,” Dr. Alexander Brzezny, Grant County Health Officer said. “Since the beginning of December, there has been a significant increase in influenza cases in all age groups in Grant County.”