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BMW rolling out car with Moses Lake carbon fiber

Moses Lake has a stake in the all-electric vehicle BMW is rolling out Thursday in Washington, D.C.

Carbon fiber for some parts was made at the SGL Carbon Fiber factory in Moses Lake.

The strong, lightweight material lowers the weight of the car and improves the battery range.

Sen. Maria Cantwell is speaking at the rollout ceremony about the Washington-made carbon fiber.

You can also see Derek Deis' "Made in the Northwest" story about SGL Automotive here: http://video.kxly.com/watch.php?id=35620

Grant County PUD warns of scam targeting customers

Grant County PUD warns of scam targeting customers

From the Grant County Sheriff’s Office and Grant County PUD:

 

Telephone scammers are calling Grant PUD customers and threatening to shut off their electricity unless an immediate payment is made. Grant PUD customers have reported receiving calls from individuals misrepresenting themselves as PUD employees and demanding that the customers meet them in a location other than a PUD office to make the payment.

Voters across Idaho send incumbent mayors packing

Voters in cities and towns across the state made it clear they are ready for leadership change in local government.

Incumbent mayors were ousted in Nampa, Lewiston, Moscow and the town of Filer in Tuesday's municipal races. New mayors were also selected in Idaho Falls and Coeur d'Alene, while voters in Blackfoot will head back to the polls next month to settle a runoff contest for mayor.

In Boise, voters elected all three city council incumbents, but results showed support fell short of the two-thirds majority needed for a pair of bond issues.

A proposal to borrow $17 million for fire department upgrades had support from 64 percent of voters, while 61 percent of voters backed a plan to borrow $10 million for parks and open space.

Savoie pleads guilty to Sorger killing

Savoie pleads guilty to Sorger killing

Evan Savoie, the Grant County man whose childhood murder conviction was overturned, has pleaded guilty and will avoid another trial.

Craig Sorger was 13 when he was stabbed to death in Eprhata in 2003. His pre-teen playmates were arrested and tried as adults, making headlines around the world. Savoie's conviction was later overturned, however, because of an error in his trial and he was scheduled to go on trial again next year.

On Monday Savoie, who is now 23, pleaded guilty to second degree murder. His plea Monday is the first time he has openly admitted to killing Sorger.

Savoie now faces between 12 and 21 years when he's sentenced in early 2014.

Washington calls together the Keepers of the Capsule

Washington calls together the Keepers of the Capsule

Nearly 25 years years ago, 10-year-olds from across Washington State were sworn in as Keepers of the Washington Centennial Time Capsule. Now, the Keepers of the Capsule are being asked to convene once again to fill the next capsule chamber and recruit a new generation of capsule keepers.

Personalized license plates celebrate 40 years

Personalized license plates celebrate 40 years

From the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife:

Label dating game leads to $165b annual food waste

Label dating game leads to $165b annual food waste

Americans waste $165 Billion worth of food each year, which averages out to about $2,200 per family. Part of that waste is caused by confusion over expiration labels.

What does sell by, use by, best by - and other labels really mean? And, will eating food past that date really make you sick?

A new study from the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic says date labels differ so widely that they are essentially useless. In fact, Washington State law only requires date labels on perishable foods. Idaho has no laws on the books requiring dates. This allows manufacturers to make their own choices about how and what they label.

As you walk through the aisles of the grocery store you pass by thousands of products and thousands of labels. Does the food go bad on its marked date? As we found out no. In fact, some of the foods we buy are still safe to eat months after the date stamped on the side.

Dates, in essence, don't tell the consumer anything about the safety of the food. We wanted to dig deeper, so two KXLY viewers allowed us to go inside their refrigerators with food safety expert Lisa Breen with the Spokane Regional Health District.