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Will recreational marijuana supply meet public's demand?

Will recreational marijuana supply meet public's demand?

Recreational marijuana is being grown right now and will hit retail store across Washington in early July but will there be enough to go around?

"This strain is called Train Wreck, it's being harvested today," said Scott O'Neil with Pacific Northwest Medical, as he trimmed a 12" long 1/4 lb. marijuana bud.

Right now O'Neil works in the medical marijuana field but in two weeks he'll be on his own.

"And we'll be selling recreational marijuana," O'Neil added.

He hopes his new store will be the first recreational marijuana store to open in Washington; O'Neil Industries, an authorized retailer of Kouchlock.

"We've secured product from a couple of vendors, definitely working on getting more. The product we have right now is probably going to last a couple days," said O'Neil.

O'Neil said some producers are already sold out for the next year and that's weeks before retail stores even open.

That supply will depend on how many growers can get up to speed in the next couple of months. In hopes of building clientele early O'Neil says he's going for as much variety as he can get his hands on.

Health Department begins West Nile testing

Health Department begins West Nile testing

From the Washington State Department of Health:


The Department of Health is again monitoring for West Nile virus through mosquito testing and collecting reports of certain types of dead birds. The virus is now well-established in some areas of the state. West Nile virus typically becomes active in the spring and summer during mosquito season when the insects feed on infected birds.

Public comment sought on Grant County shoreline project

Public comment sought on Grant County shoreline project

From the Washington State Department of Ecology:

New round of Washington charter proposals begins

Organizations that want to open a charter school in Washington state have until the end of the day on Friday to turn in a form that says they plan to apply to the statewide charter commission.

As of Thursday afternoon, five letters of intent had been posted on the state's charter school website, including some from organizations that had applied during the last round but weren't approved.

The next deadline in the process will be July 15, when formal applications to open a charter school are due. After public forums, interviews and other evaluations, The Charter School Commission plans to vote in October on which schools will be given tentative approval to open.

Salmon make way around cracked Columbia River dam

Salmon are making their way past the Wanapum and Rock Island dams after changes were made in fish ladders because of the lowered reservoir behind the Wanapum Dam, which is on the Columbia River near Vantage.

The Grant and Chelan County Public Utility Districts made the changes in May as part of the response to a crack found in the Wanapum Dam.

The news website iFIBER One News reports the ladders were tested with 250 fish released with tags. All the fish made it past both dams on their way upstream.

Wildfire weather in Eastern Washington

Wildfire weather in Eastern Washington

A combination of gusty winds and low humidity is raising the wildfire danger Monday afternoon and evening in parts of Eastern Washington.

The National Weather Service has issued a red flag warning from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday in the Columbia Basin, including the cities of Wenatchee, Ephrata, Moses Lake, Waterville and Ritzville.

Forecasters expect 15 to 25 mph winds with gusts to 40 as a front blows across the state. With a relative humidity in the 20s or lower, there's a danger any fire would spread rapidly.

The Weather Service says the system will bring a chance of light rain Tuesday to Western Washington and showers and thunderstorms to Eastern Washington.

Working 4 You: Talking to Kids About School Violence

Working 4 You: Talking to Kids About School Violence

Mass shootings and school violence take a toll on all of us. But, imagine being a kid and having to process the idea they could be a target, just by heading to school. There are resources available to help you talk to your kids.

School violence is not new. The 1996 shooting at Frontier Jr. High in Moses Lake woke up a lot of people in Eastern Washington to the fact it really can happen here. But, with shootings happening more often, it's more likely your kids will be talking about the violence and could have some very real fears.

We asked parents on Facebook Friday how they handle these shootings when it comes to their kids. Some suggest arming faculty and staff, which Spokane Schools plan to do with school resource officers. Others suggest educating their kids at home to avoid the threat altogether. No matter what, you have to expect your kids will ask. What you tell them depends on how old they are and what you think they can handle.