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Working 4 You: Talking to Kids About School Violence

Working 4 You: Talking to Kids About School Violence

Mass shootings and school violence take a toll on all of us. But, imagine being a kid and having to process the idea they could be a target, just by heading to school. There are resources available to help you talk to your kids.

School violence is not new. The 1996 shooting at Frontier Jr. High in Moses Lake woke up a lot of people in Eastern Washington to the fact it really can happen here. But, with shootings happening more often, it's more likely your kids will be talking about the violence and could have some very real fears.

We asked parents on Facebook Friday how they handle these shootings when it comes to their kids. Some suggest arming faculty and staff, which Spokane Schools plan to do with school resource officers. Others suggest educating their kids at home to avoid the threat altogether. No matter what, you have to expect your kids will ask. What you tell them depends on how old they are and what you think they can handle.

Rejoice fritter fans! It's National Doughnut Day!

Rejoice fritter fans! It's National Doughnut Day!

Friday is National Doughnut Day, also known as, well, Friday among journalists, and what better way to celebrate to celebrate the holiday that with a couple dozen maple bars, apple fritters and bear claws.

One of the biggest boosters for National Doughnut Day every day is Brenda Rigby, the manager of Scrumdiddlyumptious Donuts and reigning donut queen, who her regulars call a bit of a spark plug.

"She is like a firecracker, you never know what's going to happen," Tom Peterson said.

"Twinkle toes, just a nickname, she is always on the go," Del Murphy said.

Peterson and Murphy are at her donut shop every day.

"It's great having them here. And Deputy Craig [Chamberlin] was here and it is always good to see him," Rigby said.

Chamberlin was in rare form Friday morning, talking with the Salvation Army's Sheila Gearaghty about why donuts came about in the first place. The answer? The Salvation Army created them to hand out to soldiers, or rather doughboys, during World War I.

Navy SEAL expresses grave concern about Bergdahl prisoner swap

Navy SEAL expresses grave concern about Bergdahl prisoner swap

Navy SEAL Jason Redman, who captured enemy insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan during his tour of duty, expressed his anger about the five prisoners the U.S. swapped for Bowe Bergdahl's release from the Taliban while talking with local law enforcement officers at Gonzaga University Wednesday.

Redman, who was shot eight times in an al-Qaida ambush in 2007, worries some detainees freed from Guantanamo Bay are the same people his unit faced on the battlefield.

Redman was in Spokane Wednesday to talk to approximately 200 local law enforcement officers, Washington State troopers and airmen from Fairchild Air Force Base at Gonzaga University, sharing his incredible story of survival and determination.

While on tour in Iraq, Redman's team faced a life or death situation when they hit an ambush.

"Unfortunately we walked right into an ambush situation," he said. "They had pre-staged fighting positions, two PKM machine guns. multiple AK-47s."

After five years in captivity Bergdahl faces long recovery

After five years in captivity Bergdahl faces long recovery

Long time Spokane resident Dale Storr remembers what its like to come home after being a prisoner of war, and said that Bowe Bergdahl has a long road to recovery ahead of him.

In 1991, Storr was an Air Force A-10 pilot who was shot down and held captive by Saddam Hussein's Republican Guard for 33 days. During his captivity he endured torture and even bombing by American warplanes. Lt. Col. Storr, who retired from the 141st Air Refueling Wing after 28 years of service in 2011, remembers the savage and brutal treatment he received at the hands of his Iraqi captors.

Throw in five years Bergdahl's been held prisoner and no one expect him to make a speedy recovery.

Storr was on his 17th mission on February 2, 1991 when his aircraft was hit during a strafing run. The strike severed the control cables of his plane as well as damaged his radio.

"Fortunately for me I ejected just in time, just before the plane hit the ground, got the chute. I landed without injuries and as soon as I was on the ground I could see the truck with the Iraqis coming to get me," he recalled.

Are lawmakers looking to end the war on cannabis?

Lawmakers in Congress voted to restrict DEA funding so that the feds wouldn't go after medical marijuana operations in states where it's legal. It's one of the first signs U.S. lawmakers are looking to end the war on cannabis.

Basically this legislation would mean medical marijuana growers following the rules wouldn't have to fear being raided by the DEA. The DEA would have to focus their resources elsewhere.

"It's come about and we're still going to keep pushing forward until we get the results we want, that's why we vote," Joseph Harrison at Kouchlock Productions said.

That's what the U.S. House of Representatives recognized in its vote, passing a measure to block federal agents from pursuing legal medical marijuana operations.

"They're not going to be singled out and targeted and they're not going to be arrested and that's definitely the key point to this," Harrison said.

23-year-old dies in ATV accident in Grant County

A 23-year-old man from Auburn, Washington, has died from injuries received during an all-terrain vehicle accident near Soap Lake in Grant County.

The Grant County sheriff's office reports Collin D. Murdock was the passenger in a ATV being driven Friday on private property about seven miles east of Soap Lake. The vehicle hit a skid and Murdock apparently jumped off and hit his head on irrigation equipment.

KPQ Radio reports Murdock's friends drove him to Columbia Basin Hospital in Ephrata where he died Friday evening.

The driver of the ATV, 24-year-old Matthew J. Giandalia of Kent, suffered minor injuries. He was treated and released from Columbia Basin Hospital. Neither Giandalia nor Murdock was wearing a helmet.

Pilot killed in Banks Lake plane crash

The pilot of a float plane was killed when his aircraft failed to take off and nosed over into Banks Lake Saturday.

According to witnesses at the scene, the aircraft was a float plane attempting to take off from Banks Lake but never gained altitude and nosed over into the water.

Witnesses report that some individuals at the scene cut the pilot out of the plane, but he had been underwater for approximately six to seven minutes and had died before they were able to reach him. The aircraft sank into the lake within 20 minutes.

The pilot was the only person on board the aircraft at the time of the mishap, according to witnesses.

Deputies from the Grant County Sheriff's Office along with local police from the Grand Coulee Dam area are on the scene.